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Ranes Dental | Blog in Plainsboro

                        

RANE'S EXCLUSIVELY YOURS DENTAL

All Phases of Dentistry On Site
Children, Adults, Seniors

10 Schalks Crossing Road Plainsboro, NJ 08536
609.275.1777

       

 

Blog
 

Health Benefits of Straight Teeth

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An Insight Into Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMD)

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5 Dental New Year Resolutions You Should Make and Keep

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USE YOUR DENTAL BENEFITS BY DEC 31ST OR YOU MAY LOSE THEM!!!

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WHY RENT TEETH WHEN YOU CAN BUY THEM?

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Send them BACK TO SCHOOL with a Healthy Smile!!

Your children may have the latest wardrobe, school supplies and sports equipment for the new school year, but do they have a healthy mouth and the tools they'll need to maintain it?

According to the American Dental Association, a dental examination is as important as immunizations and booster shots and should be a regular part of back-to-school preparations. Statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say that tooth decay affects U.S children more than any other chronic infectious disease and 19 percent of children ages 2 to 19 years old have untreated tooth decay. Dental pain or disease can lead to difficulty in eating, speaking, playing and learning as well as millions of hours of missed school.

Your child's back-to-school checklist should include:

Regular dental examinations to diagnose and treat or prevent dental problems. Parents and teachers may not realize there's a dental problem, so regular checkups are important. Your dentist may suggest fluoride treatments or sealants to prevent decay and can diagnose and treat dental problems to save your child pain and lost school time.

Regular brushing with fluoride toothpaste and flossing.

Head for the dental care isle when you're out shopping for notebooks, binders and pencils. If parents buy several toothbrushes they could have their child change to a new one every three months or so, or after an illness. If it's hard to remember when to change a brush, you could try to change it every time report cards come out. Ask your dentist for a recommendation on how often to change toothbrushes.

Eating healthy lunches and snacks. Include portable healthy lunch items and snacks in your child's sack lunch, including grains, milk, cheese, raw vegetables, yogurt or fruit. If your child eats in the school cafeteria, review healthy, balanced food choices with him before the first day of school. Cut back on sugary foods and soft drinks.

Wearing a properly fitted mouthguard while participating in organized sports, PE classes or playground activities.

Give us a call at 609-275-1777 today to schedule an appointment

Transferring From Another Orthodontist Mid Treatment? Think Again!

By Dr. Anna Morrison, DMD, MS, Orthodontist, RANE'S DENTAL

Transfer orthodontic patients are a typical part of any active orthodontic practice. Families and individuals move for various reasons such as job transfers, proximity to extended family members, geographic and climate changes, and boarding school or college enrollment. In these scenarios, switching orthodontists to continue active orthodontic treatment in a new location is inevitable. However, it has come to my attention that more and more families are choosing and planning to be a ‘transfer’ orthodontic case.  What I mean is that some of our foreign patients with family members abroad choose to start their orthodontic treatment abroad – while visiting family members or vacationing – knowing that they will need to continue active treatment with another orthodontist back home, upon their return.  The reasoning behind this is oftentimes financially driven or motivated. As a locally-practicing orthodontist, I would like to refute the myth that starting orthodontic treatment intentionally, with the intention to continue treatment elsewhere, is financially advantageous and/or beneficial to the patient in any other way.  There are numerous inherent challenging factors in these situations: 

  • Most orthodontists have different philosophies pertaining to diagnosing and treatment planning cases. (Some orthodontists prefer to do a lot of early orthodontic treatment or phase I - to balance growth and dental development – while others prefer to treat only once permanent teeth have erupted and baby teeth have fallen. Some orthodontists are comfortable extracting permanent teeth while others try to avoid extractions by all means. Some orthodontists are more comfortable with compromise finishes in cases in non-growing patients with significant skeletal imbalances while others turn to surgical treatment plans.)
  • The variability of orthodontic treatment philosophies is likely further exacerbated by different training residency programs, cultural preferences specific to the region and distinct ideal aesthetic frameworks.
  • Different orthodontists utilize different mechanics, modalities and appliances to treat their patients. Even doctors trained around the same time period within the same geographic region find that different appliances work better in their hands to get the job done.
  • Clinician's preferences vary; something as simple as positioning or placement of braces on teeth can be somewhat different based on the doctor.

 

To summarize, there can be a true rift between the foreign orthodontist starting the treatment and the one taking over that transfer case. Pragmatically, there can be clinical and financial implications as a result of this rift or different treatment approach. We have had transfer cases that presented with fixed appliances and extracted permanent teeth that I would have treated without any extractions. Thus, a different clinical treatment plan altogether was initiated and I had to make accommodations to adapt to the decisions and preferences of the original orthodontist. Furthermore, I have had transfer cases with braces bonded distinctively enough that I had to remove them, polish the adhesive off and re-bond new braces on the teeth from scratch. I have also done this when the braces bonded by the starting orthodontist were not the same as the braces that we use in our practice in terms of size, appearance or prescription. In these situations, not only was there extra chair time and inconvenience for the patient of initially starting the braces, removing them and rebonding them again but usually an additional expense. In these cases, when new appliances have to placed, the treatment essentially has to be started over. As a result, no savings or discounts are feasible for patient families that present with initial orthodontic appliances in place. Usually, such cases actually cost more since the initial appliance placement investment or down payment is forfeited. Also the poor patient has to go through a tedious process of getting braces on a second time. In conclusion, it is usually simpler and more efficient to have the orthodontic treatment initiated and finished by the same doctor. Clinically, this often leads to a seamless treatment progression, less total time in treatment and congruent decision-making pertaining to the need for extractions, appliances selected and intervals between adjustments. Financially, this frequently leads to a less expensive treatment case. Thus, it is critical that the families considering starting orthodontic treatment and transferring for treatment continuation consider all the pertinent factors at hand and make a prudent decision.

Rane’s Exclusively Yours Dental (Main Office)

All Phases of Dentistry for Children and Adults
Plainsboro Plaza Shopping Center (Next to Romeos Restaurant)
10 Schalks Crossing Rd., Plainsboro, NJ
(609) 275 1777
www.ranesdental.com

Rane’s Dental Aesthetics (A Dental Specialty Extension for Orthodontics and Periodontics)

New Plainsboro Village (Beside 1st Constitution Bank)
11 Schalks Crossing Road, Plainsboro, NJ
(609) 750 1666
www.ranesorthoperio.com

Smile, sunshine is good for your teeth

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Summer Time is the Perfect Season and a Great Reason to Begin with Invisalign or Braces!

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The Adolescent (Teen) Dental Check Up
By Dr. Janhavi Rane, DDS

Adolescents may face oral health problems which require them to visit a dentist or other healthcare professional. Irregular teeth growth is a common problem and adolescents with braces are a common sight. Another problem is wisdom teeth extraction or the removal of the third molar. Dental cavities are yet another common problem in adolescents. Before your child goes back to school or college you may want to take care of these issues so they don’t interrupt the school year.

Orthodontics is a specialty in dentistry which deals with correction, development and prevention of irregular teeth, jaw and bite. If a general dentist sees these abnormalities in the adolescent, he/she will refer the patient to an orthodontist. The American Dental Association suggests that every adolescent above the age of seven should get an orthodontic evaluation done. Problems which require orthodontic treatment are crowded or crooked teeth, extra teeth, missing teeth, under-bite, overbite, jaw joint disorder, and incorrect or misaligned jaw position. When adolescents wear braces they have to take precautions in order to avoid any more oral health complications. The most important precautionary measure is to brush the teeth regularly after every meal. Since the food can be easily lodged in braces, it is a good idea to brush carefully with soft bristles toothbrush, fluoride toothpaste and floss as often as possible. Food stuffs which are sticky or hard like caramel, chewy candy, popcorn, and nuts should be avoided as they are difficult to remove and a cleaning must be done by the hygienist or general dentist, every three to six months.

Wisdom teeth or third molars can grow usually from age fifteen to twenty five. These teeth can cause problem, because most of mouths are too small to accommodate them. If the wisdom tooth has place to grow, without affecting other teeth, they can be left to themselves. But if the adolescent experiences pain, facial swelling, mouth infection and gum-line swelling, then they should be extracted immediately. They can also destroy the second molars and affect other teeth. A general dentist or an oral surgeon can perform wisdom tooth surgery in the office using local anesthesia or sedation.

Tooth decay (cavities) is also 5 times more common in adolescents than asthma. Dietary sugar and mouth bacteria form an acid which eats away minerals within the tooth, forming a cavity. The biggest prevention against cavities is brushing teeth twice a day and even better, after every meal with fluoride toothpaste and a soft bristle toothbrush. Carbonated drinks and sugary food must be avoided. Intake of fluoridated water also helps a lot or fluoride supplements can be used as replacement.

While dental cavities only affect the tooth, periodontal or gum disease is devastating, affecting the bones and gums that surround the tooth. A dentist specializing in the treatment of periodontal disease is known as a Periodontist. The disease should not be taken lightly and if it’s left untreated it can spread and affect the bones under the teeth which eventually making the teeth loose and fall out. According to statistics plaque buildup is the main cause of gum related diseases. Other possible causes include: Genetics, poor oral hygiene, food getting stuck too frequently in the gums, mouth breathing, low nutrient or vitamin c deficient diet, smoking, diabetes, autoimmune/systemic disease, changes in hormone levels, certain medications and constant teeth grinding. According to statistics nearly sixty six percent young adult population suffers from periodontal disease. There are various symptoms and it could differ from one adolescent to the other which may include swollen, tender, and red gums; bleeding of gums during brushing or flossing, receding gums; constant odorous breath; loose teeth and change in alignment of jaw and bite. Periodontal disease can be diagnosed after reviewing the complete medical history, physical examination of the teenager’s mouth and x-rays. The treatment usually involves plaque removal, medication and in worse cases a surgery.

At Rane’s Dental Offices we have three General Dentists, an Orthodontist, a Periodontist and an Oral Surgeon in house to deal with all of the above adolescent oral health issues and more.

Rane’s Exclusively Yours Dental (General Dentistry)
Plainsboro Shopping Center (Beside Powerhouse Gym and Dunkin Donuts)
10 Schalks Crossing Rd., Plainsboro, NJ
(609) 275 1777

Rane’s Dental Aesthetics (Orthodontics, Periodontics and Oral Surgery)
New Plainsboro Village (Beside 1st Constitution Bank)
11 Schalks Crossing Rd., Plainsboro, NJ
(609) 750 1666

 

Posted by Dr. Ranes at 8/13/2013 8:49 PM

 

Dental Implants

If you have one or more missing teeth, and you would like to smile, speak, and eat again comfortably and with confidence, dental implants may be an ideal option for you. Dental implants are natural-looking replacements for teeth that have been lost due to decay, gum disease, root canal failure or trauma, or for teeth that never properly developed. Dental implants look and feel so natural, nobody will ever know you were once missing teeth. Dental implants can secure or replace loose dentures or partial denture. By now you are probably wondering what a dental implant costs. Replacing a tooth with an implant is a procedure that actually consists of three separate stages, and each stage usually incurs its own cost. It is important to first become familiar with these three stages in order to understand how the prices of dental implants accumulate resulting in the final cost of dental implant.

 

Stage 1: Placing the implant fixture

The implant fixture is the portion of the dental implant that lies below the gum line and acts as the artificial root for the new replacement tooth. It is a titanium screw that is surgically placed into the jawbone. It is left untouched for several months while the surgical site heals and the dental implant anchors itself to the surrounding bone, a process known as osseointegration.

Stage 2: Placing the abutment

Once the implant site has healed and the implant fixture is osseointegrated into the surrounding bone, a post or "abutment" is placed into the implant. The abutment is usually screwed into the implant fixture about four to six months after the implant was surgically placed by the implant dentist. The abutment protrudes above the gum line and supports the final crown.

Stage 3: Placing the final crown

After the abutment is placed, an impression is taken and sent to a dental laboratory where a porcelain or porcelain-fused-to-metal crown is fabricated. The crown is returned to the dentist who then permanently cements it onto the abutment.

 

Variables Affecting Cost

Now that you understand the three stages of tooth replacement with a dental implant, it will be easier to understand how the cost is incurred. In additional there are variable costs like bone graft, extractions etc. that need to be taken into consideration. If you see advertisements for dental implants at ridiculously low fees, don't be fooled. If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Quality implants do come at a price, and there are many factors affecting the cost of dental implants.

Posted by Dr. Ranes at 7/24/2013 9:20 AM

Ortho Emergency Tips

The summer is almost upon us and that means vacation and travel time. We hope that each of you gets some well-deserved rest and relaxation, and time away. Whether you go on a family vacation, camp, amusement park, or a getaway to the beach be sure to think about your braces when you are packing. Here are a few items you should be certain to take with you in addition to your toothbrush:

  • Orthodontic Wax
  • Waterpik
  • Floss & threaders or super floss (Glide)
  • Proxy brushes
  • Rubber bands (when directed by your doctor)
  • Ibuprofen or Advil

 

Emergencies:

  1. If you have a loose bracket - if it still attached to the wire, leave it in place and try to put wax on it. If the bracket is completely out, keep it for us to use at your repair appointment.
  2. If you have a loose band - remove it and hold on to it for us to use at your repair appointment. Do not leave a loose band in place as it can serve as a food and bacteria trap.
  3. Loose Wire - Try to put it back in place with tweezers. If you are not able to re-insert the wire, clip the wire using fingernail clippers or cuticle clippers behind the last tooth to which it is still attached. Use wax on a sharp edge if the wire is still sharp.
  4. Poking Wire or broken wire hook - Try to push it down using the eraser end of a pencil. Use wax if wire is still sharp.
  5. Sore Teeth - Use warm salt water rinses and take Advil or Ibuprofen as recommended for your age. Drink lots of fluids. Some soreness is common during orthodontic treatment, particularly at the start of treatment, after each adjustment, and following onset of elastic wear.

 

Posted by Dr. Ranes at 5/31/2013 10:17 PM

 

Ortho Emergency Tips

Watch Travel Tips with Braces

The summer is almost upon us and that means vacation and travel time. We hope that each of you gets some well deserved rest and relaxation, and time away. Whether you go on a family vacation, camp, amusement park, or a getaway to the beach be sure to think about your braces when you are packing. Here are a few items you should be certain to take with you in addition to your toothbrush:

– Orthodontic Wax

– Waterpik
– Floss & threaders or super floss (Glide)
– Proxy brushes 
– Rubber bands (when directed by your doctor)
– Ibuprofen or Advil

 

Emergencies:

(1) If you have a loose bracket - if it still attached to the wire, leave it in place and try to put wax on it. If the bracket is completely out, keep it for us to use at your repair appointment.

(2) If you have a loose band - remove it and hold on to it for us to use at your repair appointment. Do not leave a loose band in place as it can serve as a food and bacteria trap.

 

(3) Loose Wire - Try to put it back in place with tweezers. If you are not able to re-insert the wire, clip the wire using fingernail clippers or cuticle clippers behind the last tooth to which it is still attached. Use wax on a sharp edge if the wire is still sharp.

 

(4) Poking Wire or broken wire hook - Try to push it down using the eraser end of a pencil. Use wax if wire is still sharp.


(5) Sore Teeth - Use warm salt water rinses and take Advil or Ibuprofen as recommended for your age. Drink lots of fluids. Some soreness is common during orthodontic treatment, particul

Ortho Emergency Tips

Watch Travel Tips with Braces

 

The summer is almost upon us and that means vacation and travel time. We hope that each of you gets some well deserved rest and relaxation, and time away. Whether you go on a family vacation, camp, amusement park, or a getaway to the beach be sure to think about your braces when you are packing. Here are a few items you should be certain to take with you in addition to your toothbrush:

– Orthodontic Wax

– Waterpik

– Floss & threaders or super floss (Glide)

– Proxy brushes

– Rubber bands (when directed by your doctor)

– Ibuprofen or Advil

 

Emergencies:

(1) If you have a loose bracket - if it still attached to the wire, leave it in place and try to put wax on it. If the bracket is completely out, keep it for us to use at your repair appointment.

(2) If you have a loose band - remove it and hold on to it for us to use at your repair appointment. Do not leave a loose band in place as it can serve as a food and bacteria trap.

 

(3) Loose Wire - Try to put it back in place with tweezers. If you are not able to re-insert the wire, clip the wire using fingernail clippers or cuticle clippers behind the last tooth to which it is still attached. Use wax on a sharp edge if the wire is still sharp.

 

(4) Poking Wire or broken wire hook - Try to push it down using the eraser end of a pencil. Use wax if wire is still sharp.

 

(5) Sore Teeth - Use warm salt water rinses and take Advil or Ibuprofen as recommended for your age. Drink lots of fluids. Some soreness is common during orthodontic treatment, particularly at the start of treatment, after each adjustment, and following onset of elastic wear.

 

Posted by Dr. Ranes at 5/31/2013 10:17 PM | Add Comment

 

What is Invisalign?

Having a confident smile can change everything and Invisalign makes the decision easy, because you can get a stunning smile without most people even noticing you’re going through treatment!

Invisalign treatment consists of a series of clear aligners that you change about every two weeks. These aligners are made from a mould of your teeth that is taken by your dentist. Each aligner is individually manufactured with exact calculations to gradually shift your teeth into the desired place.  Since your Invisalign system is custom-made for your teeth and your teeth only, with a plan devised by your dentist or orthodontist with your input, you know you’ll end up with a smile that truly fits.  You can see the difference at any stage by seeing pictures of your teeth that are taken before you start the treatment and after pictures of your brand new smile.

If you’re ready for a smile that transforms your appearance, Invisalign is your answer. Although there are many choices out there, no other works as effortlessly as the Invisalign system. Invisalign is the best way to transform your smile without interfering with your day-to-day life. In fact, not only adults but a lot of our teens prefer Invisalign to wearing Braces. So start on the right track today, and to find out if you are a candidate, call us for a complimentary consult at 609 275-1777.

 

Posted by Dr. Ranes at 4/3/2013 10:15 PM

The Dental Insurance Puzzle

Do you ever wonder why you receive a bill from the dentist even though you have dental insurance and paid your co pay?
Well I used to till I became a dentist myself and was enlightened to the whole world of dental insurance. Let me clarify that dental insurance is a completely different animal from medical insurance. Some medical insurances will cover particular types of dental treatment like jaw surgeries, wisdom teeth extractions etc; but in general you cannot go to a dental office with medical insurance and expect to be covered for dental work. Dental care has separate insurance plans.

Why is it so difficult to understand dental insurance?

Dental insurance is a very complex area creating confusion for many people. The lack of sufficient
information provided by some dentists and some insurance companies makes it almost impossible for patients to properly understand their benefits. Dental insurance is typically a contract between your employer (this could be you if you’re self-employed) and a dental insurance company. The benefits that you receive are based on the terms of the contract that were negotiated between your employer and the dental insurance company and not your dental office. The goal of most dental insurance policies is to provide only basic care for specific dental services.

What if you need some particular type of dental treatment according to your dentist and your insurance company does not cover it?

Unfortunately dental insurance companies don’t look at what a person needs but go by what has been negotiated between them and your employer. Here’s an example. If a patient has a small cavity, I would do a white filling also called a tooth colored filling rather than a silver filling, because less tooth structure needs to be drilled, it’s a bonded filling giving a better seal, looks better, usually does not need any anesthetic injections making it painless, and I believe it’s a better restoration in the long run. For a silver filling the tooth has to be drilled more as it needs a certain depth even if your cavity is not that deep running the risk of making your tooth sensitive. Also silver fillings look ugly when you open your mouth. So given the choice I would do only tooth colored fillings as far as possible. It’s the better treatment for the patient. When most insurance companies say they cover 80% of fillings it’s usually the silver filling and you will have to pay your 20% plus the difference between the cost of the silver and white filling. That’s where the confusion typically
arises when you get your dental bill.

Also what’s the difference between a deductible and a co pay?

These are two separate entities. A deductible is a one-time fee that you pay each year to your insurance company. It’s collected at your dentist’s office but it goes to the insurance company. You can think of it as an annual fee charged by the insurance company for processing your claims etc. A co pay is a payment you make to the dentist as a part of the payment for a particular treatment. A co pay will vary depending on what you had done. It varies according to the percentage your insurance will pay for that treatment. Say if your insurance pays 60% for root canals your co pay will be 40% of the amount you need to pay for the root canal. A dentist participating in an insurance plan is bound by his contract with the insurance company to collect any co pays that they state he or she should collect.

At Rane’s Dental Offices, our treatment coordinators make sure that insurance and finances are discussed with you before we do any treatment so we can avoid shocking you with that dental bill. Please feel free to call us at 609 275-1777 if you still have dental insurance questions and we will try to get answers for you, promise!!

 

Posted by Dr. Ranes at 3/11/2013 9:05 PM

Sports Safety, see if your child’s sport is in here

Avoiding injuries is the only way to stay in the game! Does your child wear a mouth guard while playing his/her sport?

If you/your child participate in any of the following activities, the American Dental Association and the Academy for Sports Dentistry recommend that you wear a properly fitted mouth guard.

  • Acrobatics
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Bicycling
  • Boxing
  • Equestrian
  • Events
  • Extreme Sports
  • Field Hockey
  • Football
  • Gymnastics
  • Handball
  • Ice Hockey
  • Inline Skating
  • Lacrosse
  • Martial Arts
  • Racquetball
  • Rugby
  • Shot Putting
  • Skateboarding
  • Skiing
  • Skydiving
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Squash
  • Surfing
  • Volleyball
  • Water Polo
  • Weightlifting
  • Wrestling

A mouth guard should be such that you will wear it:

  • One that does not flex too much or tear
  • One that can be cleaned easily
  • One that does not limit your breathing or speech
  • One that is custom made by your dentist

 

Don’t Choke!

Don’t chew gum or anything else while playing active sports. A fall or push could cause you to choke.


Call us at 609-275-1777 if you would like a mouth guard made or like more information.

 

Posted by Dr. Ranes at 2/18/2013 11:18 PM 

Oral Surgeon and Wisdom Teeth

An oral surgeon is a dental specialist who is trained to handle dental implants, TMJ (temporomandibular joint) disorders, facial pain, and restorative surgical procedures such as wisdom teeth removals. In addition, an oral surgeon can also treat tooth and facial injuries, such as broken jaws, broken or knocked-out teeth, oral cancers and can perform facial cosmetic surgeries. An oral surgeon attends four years of dental school and at least four years of hospital surgical residency.

Your general dentist will recommend a visit to an oral surgeon when you require service beyond the general dentist’s scope. Oral surgeons, also called maxillofacial surgeons, are trained to detect, diagnose, and prevent defects and diseases that affect the mouth, jaw, teeth, and gums.

If a wisdom tooth is causing pain, you should immediately consult with your dentist to determine if your tooth should be removed. Wisdom teeth, which usually start to emerge during young adulthood, can cause problems if your mouth is too small to accommodate the teeth. During a checkup, your dentist will take x-rays to determine the position of your wisdom tooth. If it appears that the tooth is embedded or not growing in straight, your dentist may recommend surgery to extract the tooth and may refer you to an oral surgeon for this. Keep in mind that if there is a problem with your tooth, it is best to have it removed early on. Since wisdom teeth are the last to

develop, it is possible to have them removed as soon as a problem is detected and before they are fully developed – making surgery a little easier.

The American Dental Association recommends having a wisdom tooth removed if:

  • The tooth is embedded under the gum and in the jawbone and can cause damage to other teeth and bone. This will require the dentist to make an incision into the overlying gum and bone to remove the tooth.
  • The tooth is partially emerged through the gum, leaving a flap of gum over the tooth. Wisdom teeth
  • are already difficult to clean because they are so far back in the mouth. If food and bacteria get trapped under the flap of a partially emerged wisdom tooth, it can lead to tooth decay and gum infection.
  • A cyst develops around the tooth. A cyst is a fluid-filled sac and can lead to infection in the gums.
  • The tooth is growing sideways, forward, backward, or at some other odd angle that will cause
  • discomfort and damage to surrounding teeth.

Recovery usually takes a few days and may require pain medication to alleviate any discomfort. Follow your dentist’s instructions for a safe and quick recovery. If your wisdom teeth (third molars) look healthy and have plenty of room to develop, your dentist may still want to discuss the benefits of removing them as sometimes they can lead to tooth decay and gum infection since they are difficult to brush and floss. Keep in mind, though, that just as there are risks to having wisdom teeth, there are also minor risks associated with the surgery involved in having them removed.

Consult with your oral care provider to determine the position and health of your wisdom teeth. If you have a wisdom tooth that is causing pain.


Posted by Dr. Ranes at 2/7/2013 10:56 PM 

 
 
 
Plainsboro Dentist | Blog. Janhavi Rane is a Plainsboro Dentist.